Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping

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News

Kent Farrington riding Voyeur at the CHI Geneva 2017 (Photo: Kit Houghton) Kent Farrington riding Voyeur at the CHI Geneva 2017 (Photo: Kit Houghton)

Exclusive Interview with Rolex Testimonee, Kent Farrington

 

Can you talk us through your incredible recovery process?

 

“I am a really active person, so I didn’t want to rest for too long. After the surgery I was walking around the hospital on crutches when everyone else was asleep – I think it was only 10 or 11 hours after my operation, but I felt I needed to move.

 

Once I was out of hospital I had a week of resting at home to recover. It was exhausting as I was unable to sleep properly and would often wake up in the night because of the medication and the pain, but I wanted to start my rehab as soon as possible so I could get back to my sport. In my mind I was in a hurry to recover and I didn’t want to sit back and wait for that to happen. I think that recovery is down to healing physically but also focusing mentally and that’s what I was determined to do. I started training every other day, doing simple exercises at home e.g. lying on the couch bending and straightening my leg in sets. I would repeat this every other hour, just doing these sets all day to build my strength.

 

As I got stronger, I frequently got x-rays to evaluate the progress. If you overtrain you can build too much bone and that can have a real negative impact on your healing and can result in you stopping your training altogether which would have been a disaster for me – it’s all about the right balance.

 

I also had another problem; when I fell the bone came out of my skin so I had a big wound and a high risk of infection. I had doctors working on that too and was sending photos to the doctors every day to monitor it.

 

As process went on and the rehab developed, I did a lot of weight resistance on my leg – gruelling exercises, elliptical machine routines, bounce exercises and putting my own body weight on one leg and teaching myself to walk again really. I started training 2-3 times a day, repeating all the same exercises, I also bought a rowing machine, so I could train at home in between sessions with my physical trainer.

 

I did training sessions at 5.30am or 9.30pm as I wanted to be on my own. I work better on my own as I like to do my own thing and focus on getting stronger.  I was really grateful that my trainer would come in early or stay late just to focus on me.

 

That was my routine, eat, sleep and train.

 

As you go on, and you are motivated to get better, you learn to cope with it all. I am motivated on my own, so I didn’t need to extra help for that. Getting back to the sport, my amazing horses and my big team of riders and owners motivated me and made excited to get healthy again.”

 

Can you tell us about the team of people who helped with your recovery process?

 

“Firstly, I had a fantastic doctor, Dr Nicholas Sama. He is a pro at this job and really took an interest above and beyond what a normal doctor should. I was going to his office a minimum of once week and they took it on as a cause to get me back to my sport as quickly as possible with a full recovery physically.

 

Ed Smith from Athletes Advantage in Wellington, Florida – a training a rehabilitation centre – was another very influential person. I was going there before and after normal business hours and he was there for me, to train me through everything. These aren’t things those guys have to do, and I am so grateful for all of that support. Top of their field.

 

I have a really strong team at home. Claudio Baroni is a fantastic rider and helps me to exercise the horses and we made a plan together just two days after the operation. We made a calendar of what all my horses were going to do while I was recovering, and it was great to know they would be in safe hands.  When you do things like that--putting your mind in the focus of planning for the future--it pushes me to do everything in my power to be as good as I can and as quick as I can in my recovery.”

 

The film you posted on Instagram has had a lot of interest, can you talk us through it?

 

“I think that is one of the things about social media today, people are very interested in what other people are doing. People kept asking me how I was, could I work and kept questioning if I would ever be able to ride again – so thought I would post that video up and would answers everyone’s questions and show everyone that I was on a good road to recovery.”

 

How did it feel to be back in the saddle?

 

“The first couple of times I was a little apprehensive – I thought ‘am I going to remember how to ride’ etc. I had a lot of pain the first time, I couldn’t ride in the stirrups, but I had to control my mind set and tell myself it was going to better. I had to accept I could only make baby steps and each day it would get a little bit better and a little bit better.”

 

When I first jumped a course for the first time it felt good, it felt ok to ride and jump and it felt exciting. I was like a little kid at Christmas, it’s weird because when you do something your whole life you take for granted how fun something is, for me be back in the saddle and riding made me feel alive again.”

 

Royal Windsor Horse Show was your first show back, how was the experience this year?

 

“I love Royal Windsor Horse Show, it is one of the most unique competitions and to be in the Castle Grounds is so special, so I really wanted to be able to compete there. I didn’t want to push myself too much in the first class, so I went at a medium speed and came third which I was really pleased with.

 

I told myself if I could ride, I could compete and if I was going to compete I wanted to do it properly and at a 5* show, so Windsor seemed the appropriate one to aim for. “

 

What advice would you have for anyone who was experiencing a similar injury to you?

 

“The first thing is acceptance of what your injury is, understand that you’re hurt and you won’t be better in a day or a week. I wanted to educate myself on my injury, so I worked out what I could do, what I could expect and how to be realistic.

 

I looked up other athletes who had similar injuries to see what they did to recover. One particular sports star stuck with me, a basketball player called Paul George. He suffered a horrific break very similar to mine and people thought he would never play again. He recovered and came back to be one the of the best players in the NBA, so I thought if he can do it, so I can I. That was really good for my moral and motivation.”

 

Now you are back from injury, what are your main focuses this year, are you eyeing up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

 

“For sure my eye is on all the big Rolex competitions and of course the Rolex Grand Slam. I was so disappointed to miss The Dutch Masters, but I will focus on getting back on track and aim for that ultimate prize. I am excited for Aachen in July, it is one of the best competitions in the world and I am looking forward to competing against the world’s best riders.”

 

Which horses do you have high hopes for this year?

 

“I am lucky to have so many great horses, but I have particular high hopes for Creedance, Voyeur, Gazelle, and Uceko. I also have some up-and-coming young ones. I don’t think they will be ready for Grand Prix level this year but definitely high hopes for the future.”

 

Which horses do you plan to bring to CHIO Aachen in July?

 

"I am not 100% sure yet by in my ideal world I would bring Voyeur, Gazelle, and Uceko."

                                                                    

 

 

 

Niels  BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze (Photo: Kit Houghton) Niels BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze (Photo: Kit Houghton)

Interview with Niels Bruynseels, the current Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender

 

 

What HAVE YOU been up to since winning the Rolex Grand Prix at The Dutch Masters? 

 

“Straight after winning the Rolex Grand Prix I celebrated with my team, we were all so excited! It was a late finish that evening, but because I only live an hour away from the show we went back to my house and continued the celebrations there.

 

We went to Paris a week later and came second in the big competition there, but since then my horse has had a bit of a rest. This week she will start competing again as we start our preparations for CHIO Aachen and the next stage of the Rolex Grand Slam.”

 

Can you tell us a bit about your horse? 

 

“Gancia de Muze is a very special horse, she is a 12-year-old Belgian-bred mare and has a very unique character! She is very stubborn sometimes, and I have to do everything for her otherwise she gets in a bad mood! She receives a lot of special treatment, she has lots of time in the field and because she doesn’t like flat work, so she is lunged and jumped more frequently. She is very set in her ways! But she really loves her job and enjoys herself so much at the events. Every time we compete together, she really fights for me, she has a competitive nature and wants to win!”

 

Are you planning on attending CHIO Aachen? If so, how are you preparing for the next part of your Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping journey?

 

“Of course, I plan to ride in the Rolex Grand Prix at Aachen, it is one of my goals to win there. This week I plan go to Madrid and will see how my horse is performing on grass. I have scheduled some competitions on grass, specifically to prepare for the Rolex Grand Prix, with the hope to continue my Rolex Grand Slam journey.”

 

Do you have any superstitions?

 

“You could say I do have one superstition…. When I arrive at the hotel, I always layout my riding clothes in the same order, separating them out into ‘Day one’ ‘Day two’ and so on. It is a routine that I always go through. Aside from that I don’t have any other superstitions, just hope that my training pays off and I can perform to the best of my ability.”

 

Can you talk us through your daily routine when training? 

 

“The grooms start at 6.30am, they do the morning feeds and prepare the horses. I arrive at 7.30am to begin riding the horses. Each morning, before I arrive at the stables, I make a plan for the whole day which outlines the team’s responsibilities. We have a total of 25 horses, so it is important that I stay really organized to make sure everything at the yard runs smoothly. I will then spend the day riding seven-to-eight horses, so I am very busy, but I love it! I concentrate fully on the training of the horses, so the days when I am not competing are completely focused on that.”

 

How did it feel to win a Major? What was going through your mind?

 

“Winning a Grand Prix is always nice, but to win a Rolex Major is very unique and so special, the feeling was unreal. The media hype is on a whole different level, and the attention I have received since then is greater than ever. Everybody is focused on the Rolex Grand Slam as it is one of the biggest parts of our sport, so everyone is talking about it which adds to the excitement. It was a magical moment and one of the best in my career so far, I hope there will be more occasions like this!”

 

If you weren't a rider what would you be? 

 

“I have always loved horses, they are my absolute world. So, if I wasn’t a rider I would have to be something that is still horse orientated, therefore I think I would be a horse dealer.”

 

Do you have any hobbies?

 

“No hobbies, only horses! If I am at a show and have some free time I enjoy siteseeing and trying the food of the local area, but other than that it’s all about the horses.”  

 

What is your advice for young riders?

 

“My advice to young riders would be; you can always keep learning from other people. Make sure when you are at events, you are watching the other competitors and seeing how they ride. If you want to improve and progress you shouldn’t rush or be frustrated when you don’t reach the top straight away, it is a step-by-step process and you can never stop learning.”

 

Do you feel that there is added pressure as the current Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender?

 

“I don’t feel too stressed right now, but there is certainly a different sort of pressure that comes with being the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender. You are aware of more people talking about it and I have had a lot of people ask me if I am going for the Rolex Grand Slam. It is a different feeling right now, but I am sure at Aachen I will feel the extra pressure as I don’t want to give up my position of live contender!”

 

What do you want to achieve in your career, what is your dream?

 

“Aside from winning the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, I want an Olympic gold medal, whether it is with the team or as an individual, that is a big goal for me. I also hope to compete at the World Equestrian Games in Tryon this September and a medal there would be nice too!”

 

 

Niels  BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze Niels BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze (Photo: Kit Houghton)

AND THE WINNER IS...

THE ROLEX GRAND PRIX WINNER: NIELS BRUYNSEELS

Niels Bruynseels is the new Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping live contender following a sensational performance in the Rolex Grand Prix at the Dutch Masters, one of the four Majors that make up the Rolex Grand Slam.

Under the spotlights of the Brabanthal arena, the world’s best horse and rider combinations battled for the pinnacle prize of the weekend, all vying to start their Rolex Grand Slam journey.

The 13 riders clear and through to the jump off included Great Britain’s Scott Brash, the only rider ever to have won the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, which increased the pressure for the competitors. Eighth to go, Marcus Ehning raised the bar with a speedy clear round in 37.80 secs but it was Belguim’s Niels Bruynseels who shifted the pace up a gear to clinch the victory in 37.10 secs and his first ever Rolex Major win.

 

1st Place: NIELS BRUYNSEELS (BEL)

2016 and 2017 Stephex Rolex Grand Prix Winner

Horse: Gancia De Muze, a 12-year-old bay mare

2nd Place: MARCUS EHNING (GER)

Olympic Gold Medallist

Horse: Cornado NRW, a 15-year-old grey stallion

3rd Place: HARRIE SMOLDERS (NED)

World Number 2

Horse: Emerald, A 14-year-old chesnut stallion

WINNERS INTERVIEW WITH...

NIELS BRUYNSEELS

How does it feel to win your first Major?

"This has to be one of my biggest victories, I don’t even have the words to say how much it means to me. This show has always been great but the support of Rolex has made it even better and it is an honour for me to come here and compete against the best riders in the world. The atmosphere in the arena was incredible, it was a very special moment for me."

Your Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping campaign has started, is CHIO Aachen going to be your focus now?

"Aachen is certainly the next stop for me. The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is the biggest prize in our sport and I hope I can come to Germany in July and repeat what I have achieved here."

Do you feel that the course lived-up to the Rolex Grand Prix standard?

"I think the team of course designers did a very good job, it was a tough course but good for the horses. There were 13 in the jump-off which is nice for the crowd and created top competition."

And what about your horse, has she done you proud today?

"My horse was a superstar today, I cannot thank her enough. She always tries her best for me and I couldn’t be happier with her performance this afternoon. I think I was at advantage going last in the jump-off, I was able to see all the other riders go before me and where the course was difficult. I had a plan in my head, I knew I would need a fast ride, and Grancia exceeded all expectations, she is a special horse for sure."

BEHIND THE STABLE DOOR WITH...

FRANK DELVALLET, THE ROLEX GRAND PRIX WINNER'S GROOM

How emotional are you right now after that sensational win?

"It is just amazing, the horse is unbelievable! It is my first win in a 5* event and just means so much to whole team. I have only been with Niels since July, but he is an incredible rider and I just feel so emotional and have a tear in my eye right now!"

You have all now started your journey towards the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, how do you feel?

"To be a part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is so exciting, we did not expect to do so well and we hope that we can make the journey last as long as possible!"

Gancia De Muze is an incredible horse, what is she like to look after? 

"She is such a lovely horse, she is so easy to manage, she knows her job and she proved today again that she is one of the top horses on the circuit. She is going to get lots of rewards and kisses from us tonight, even though she doesn’t really like that!"

Course designer Louis Konickx (Photo: Kit Houghton) Course designer Louis Konickx (Photo: Kit Houghton)

WORDS FROM THE COURSE DESIGNER...

LOUIS KONICKX - ROLEX GRAND PRIX COURSE DESIGNER

Talk to us about the process of designing such an important course like a Rolex Grand Prix?

"We first came up with the ideas and concept three weeks ago. My assistant and I are in constant communication, always bouncing ideas off each other, it is a team effort. Because the arena is bigger this year, we added longer combinations and more related distances. It is also very important to make sure you have the right number of verticals and oxers because if you are too defensive and have too many hard oxers, it asks too much of the horse and will not achieve the desired number of clear rounds. It needs to be challenging… but achievable"

Are there any particular tricky parts you put in?

"Yes, but we wanted to make sure that there was a variety for the different types of horses. If you just build big oxers it challenges the horses that don't have scope but is easy for the horses that do, so it is vital that we have diversity which will ultimately produce the best competition. In all cases we are wanting to test the tuning between horse and rider and their ability to work together in a partnership, that is what we are searching for as course designers."

Is there more pressure on you now that this Rolex Grand Prix is part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

"Yes, there is certainly more pressure! Most of it comes from the riders, they really want to win this class and go after the Rolex Grand Slam which means we need to make sure the course gives them the opportunity to compete at the best of their ability. Now that this is part of the Rolex Grand Slam there is more at stake than just the result of this Grand Prix."

What makes you passionate about your role?

"Every day and every event is different. I have particularly enjoyed this year at the Dutch Masters as we have designed a lot of new fences and have created a sense of the Netherlands within that. We have focused on Dutch artists, for example Van Gogh, who we think represents a ‘Dutch Master’. We have also designed fences to represent the Dutch fruit, all small touches that I think make the course extra special."

Niels  BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze (Photo: Kit Houghton) Niels BRUYNSEELS riding Gancia de Muze (Photo: Kit Houghton)

EYE ON THE PRIZE : JOURNEY TO THE ROLEX GRAND SLAM

The first edition of the Dutch Masters has drawn to a spectacular close and now all eyes are on the next Major, CHIO Aachen taking place in July. With the biggest equestrian names in the world expected to attend, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping new live contender will no doubt be planning his path to victory to see if he can make history once more.

Lorenzo De Luca (Photo: Ashley Neuhof) Lorenzo De Luca (Photo: Ashley Neuhof)

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH...

LORENZO DE LUCA, NUMBER ONE ITALIAN RIDER

Who do you think is your biggest competitor on Sunday?

"There were some great performances yesterday. I think Philipp Weishaupt is looking very good, of course Daniel Deusser was on top form last night and Luciana Diniz has been riding really well so far this year. It is going to be a very tough competition as there are a lot of good riders in the line up!"

Do you have any superstitions before you compete?

"Not really. I just stay relaxed and keep my horse nice and quiet, he is very sensitive, so I need to be calm for him. I just focus on my horse, myself and that’s it!"

What advice can you give to young riders who aspire to be in your position one day?

"My best advice would be ‘to not go too quick!’ That can cause all sorts of problems. My second piece of advice is to keep learning and growing. The Show Jumping world is such a magical place, every horse and every rider is different, so you can always expand your knowledge of the sport."

Thoughts on the course tomorrow?

"It is going to be hard! Last year I remember the course was very difficult, and now the prize money has been increased and it is part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, the competition is going to tougher than ever! I think the crowds are in for a treat!"

Marcel Hunze - Show Director Marcel Hunze - Show Director (Photo: Kit Houghton)

WORDS FROM THE ORGANIZERS...

MARCEL HUNZE - SHOW DIRECTOR

 What changes have you made to this year’s show now that it has become one of the Majors?

"Well firstly we needed more space because the event is growing, and we wanted to enhance the facilities for the riders and spectators. We are lucky that we could build the new hall and add to the overall area by 7500 square metres. As a result, we have been able to increase the arena size and include more exercise areas. We have improved the riders’ accommodation, food and the facilities onsite to give them a VIP experience, they are our heroes, so we need to treat them very well. We have also improved the arena experience adding LED animated boards and enhanced the lighting and music to create more excitement and improve the spectator experience."

Do you feel under more pressure now the event is part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

"Yes, of course we are feeling the pressure more this year! The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping consisted of three of the best shows in the world, so we are very honoured be chosen as the fourth. It is hard to compare us to the outdoor shows, but Geneva is indoor and such an incredible event so we want to make sure we are on the same level. I believe this year, with the improvements we have made, everyone is happy, and we are on the right track."

You work in tennis too, how do the events differ with the contrasting sports?

"The back bone for the events is the same, it is about the sport, the promotion, visibility for the sponsors and making sure you have top facilities. In terms of the detailed differences I would say that in tennis the competitors need more physio facilities and more practice areas so that is a big focus. Of course, in tennis the athletes only have their rackets, whereas the riders have their horses which adds a whole new dimension of careful logistics."

 Who do you think is going to win the Rolex Grand Prix?

"Well, I think I need to vote for a Dutchman, so I am going to say Harrie Smolders. He is world number two and was recently awarded ‘2017 Dutch Rider of the Year’ so I think he has a good chance. "

Sean Lynch, Daniel Deusser's groom (picture: Kit Houghton). Sean Lynch, Daniel Deusser's groom (picture: Kit Houghton).

BEHIND THE STABLE DOOR WITH...

SEAN LYNCH, GROOM TO DANIEL DEUSSER, TEAM BRONZE MEDALLIST IN 2016

Who is Daniel riding in the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday?

"He is riding Cornet D’Amour on Sunday, a really special horse with a very big character. He is very sensitive to noise and when there’s lots of it, he’s not the easiest to control but he is one of the nicest horses to be around. All my horses are nice and normal though, so I never have a problem with them."

What is the horses routine immediately after a big competition like the Rolex Grand Prix at a Major?

"We give them a shower and some hay, so they can relax and cool down. We put the ice boots on and then follow up with the spa boots and as soon as they are dry we put a massage blanket on for 45 minutes! The massage blanket is amazing and has different programmes, so we usually put it on the programme designed for back treatment relief if they have jumped a big class. Cornet gets more spa treatments than any of us do!"

Are you and Daniel thinking about the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

"I am hoping that Sunday goes well and then we can really start to focus on the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. It has made show jumping more interesting for the riders and the public, and it is certainly the thing that riders talk about wanting to win the most. So, if we have success in the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday we will be planning our schedule around the next Majors for sure. "

How do you cope with the pressure of a Rolex Grand Prix? Does Daniel feel the pressure? 

"I do feel the pressure a bit! I have to do my job well enough to make sure Daniel has the best chance on Sunday. We have to work together to make sure the horse is fit and is in peak condition. With Cornet D’Amour I always get quite nervous, especially when he has won a class already like he did in the Grand Prix qualifier last night. Sometimes I just stay quiet for the whole day and don’t talk to anyone!

Daniel is Mr. cool! He doesn’t let the pressure get to him, he knows what he needs to do and does the job. For me he is one of the best riders around, very relaxed and very calm."

Kevin Staut, Anky van Grunsven (show president) and Jeroen Dubbeldam Kevin Staut, Anky van Grunsven (show president) and Jeroen Dubbeldam Photo credit: Kit Houghton

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH...

WORLD CHAMPION JEREON DUBBLEDAM AND TEAM OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST KEVIN STAUT

 

What does it mean to you as a rider to come back and try and win this Rolex Grand Prix, which is now part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

 

Kevin Staut: "It is very emotional, I am very motivated, as is everyone else, especially Jeroen who is on his home ground. I appreciate this show for all of the different atmospheres in the ring – It is amazing. It is difficult for indoor shows to have comfortable areas for the horses and now the stables are really quiet and peaceful, we have enough time and space during the day to ride our horses. Sometimes we don’t mention this enough, but for the top sport we need this kind of comfort. Back to the sport – I am motivated, I have my most experienced horse here, so I hope I can get a good result on Sunday."

 

Jeroen Dubbeldam: "This show was already one of the best indoor shows in the world but this year in particular, the progress has been incredible. They have done a fantastic job, you can almost ride everywhere and the set up is very chic. It is the first time here for the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping which is something new and special, it brings something extra to the show for us. In terms of my success, this has not been one of my favourite shows. I haven’t been successful at this show yet but things can change. Expectations are very dangerous, you can only try to prepare yourself as much as you can and hope for the best."

 

What attracts you to the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

 

"The first thing that attracts me is the sport itself. And then at a show like this, with such a high level of riders, a great atmosphere and with this beautiful brand Rolex as the main sponsor, if that doesn’t attract you as a rider then you had better stop riding."

WORDS FROM THE ORGANIZERS...

ANKY VAN GRUNSVEN - SHOW PRESIDENT AND DRESSAGE LEGEND

What does it mean for The Dutch Masters to be hosting the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping for the first time?

 

"It makes me happy and very proud, and now we have tried to make it look even better than before. We are very happy to be in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping with the other big names, Geneva, Calgary and Aachen. We are very honoured and very proud."

 

What was your reaction when you were told that The Dutch Masters would be part of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

 

"Yes! I think it works out well for both sides, we are happy with Rolex and we hope that they are happy with us, not just now but also in ten years’ time. The pressure is very good – if you think you’re done, well that is the beginning of the end. After Sunday we can start to think what ‘what can we do better next year’. That is the only way to stay at the top."

David Honnet groom to Scott Brash with Scott riding Ursula XII David Honnet groom to Scott Brash with Scott riding Ursula XII

BEHIND THE STABLE DOOR WITH…….

DAVID HONNET, GROOM TO SCOTT BRASH, THE ONLY RIDER TO HAVE WON THE ROLEX GRAND SLAM OF SHOW JUMPING

 

How do you prepare the horses for a Show like The Dutch Masters, and especially looking ahead to the Rolex Grand Prix?

 

We have to make a detailed plan three to four months in advance. A Rolex Grand Slam show is very important to Scott, and the team, so we know we have to prepare really well. It is not just me, there is a really big team behind Scott so we all work together. Ursula is pretty easy to prepare because she’s naturally good for the show, she has a lot of experience, is a very calm horse and loves to compete at the Majors especially CHIO Aachen, CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ and CHI Geneva. She is older now, so needs extra work ahead of the events to make her fit and lean because she likes her food and can get a bit fat! She also needs to be lean because the jumps are big and its easier for her to jump if she is lighter.

 

And Hello Shelby?

 

Shelby has been with us for six months now so he is still a bit green. He is the opposite of Ursula, he is fresher, so we have to keep him under control. He needs to be worked hard so that when he gets to the show he doesn’t go crazy. But he is good, he is pretty easy and straightforward.

 

What are your thoughts on the Majors that make up the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping?

 

For me, even before I worked for Scott or before Scott became a Rolex Testimonee, they have been the best shows. When you go to any of the four Majors you feel history, even if you are just a groom you get a feeling that you don’t get at the other shows. I like that they are tough courses too! You can’t have these shows every week because it is too hard on the horses but three or four times a year, when you know it is going to be hard for the rider and the horses, but the prize is big, it is great. For me the Rolex Grand Slam is the pinnacle of the sport and is almost untouchable which makes it so exciting. Knowing how hard it is to even win one Rolex Grand Prix, to win the Rolex Grand Slam will really stay in people’s heads and is recognised and respected by everyone.

 

The Rolex Grand Slam Trophy (Credit: Rolex Grand Slam) The Rolex Grand Slam Trophy (Credit: Rolex Grand Slam)

EYE ON THE PRIZE : JOURNEY TO THE ROLEX GRAND SLAM

The 5* jumping action kicked off in style at The Dutch Masters with Germany’s Daniel Deusser proving to be on top form to take the VDL Groep Prize, a qualifier for the prestigious Rolex Grand Prix taking place on Sunday 11 March.

With only three horse and rider combinations competing in the jump off, they are ones the to watch as the journey towards the Rolex Grand Slam edges a step closer:

1st Place: DANIEL DEUSSER (GER)

Olympic Team Bronze Medallist in 2016

Horse: Cornet D’Amour, a 15-year-old grey gelding

2nd Place: PHILIPP WEISHAUPT (GER)

Winner of two Majors, the Rolex Grand Prix in CHIO Aachen in 2016 and the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2017

Horse: LB Convall, an 11-year-old grey stallion

3rd Place: HARRIE SMOLDERS (NED)

World Number Two

Was honoured as the ‘2017 Rider of the Year’ in the Netherlands

Horse: Emerald, a 14-year-old chestnut stallion

TV Commercial © Rolex Grand Slam Of Show Jumping TV Commercial © Rolex Grand Slam Of Show Jumping

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping has released a pioneering new commercial to coincide with the opening Major of the year, The Dutch Masters, which takes place in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, The Netherlands, from 08 – 11 March.

 

With the theme, ‘Surpass yourself and become a legend’, the 60-second-long film promotes the dedication and passion required to win the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, which is made up of the four most internationally renowned show jumping events in the world, The Dutch Masters, CHIO Aachen, CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ and CHI Geneva.

 

The commercial will premier at The Dutch Masters, with a shorter 30-second film also due to feature on the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping social media channels. The commercial will then make its television debut to coincide with CHIO Aachen in July.

 

The highly emotive film, which is made up of footage from previous Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping events, is part of a wider new advertising campaign to promote the Rolex Grand Slam, which will also feature creative new advertising artwork and an enhanced social media presence.

 

Sophie Mottu Morel, president of the Rolex Grand Slam steering committee said, “We wanted to demonstrate the passion and determination required to reach the pinnacle of the sport and the honour and esteem bestowed upon those who achieve success.”

 

With current Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping contender, Kent Farrington, out injured, the quest to win the most sought-after prize in the sport will begin in earnest at The Dutch Masters this weekend, with a stellar field, including eight of the world’s top 10 riders set to contest the much-anticipated Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday 11 March.

Leopold van Asten - VDL Groep Zidane N.O.P.Indoor Brabant 2017© DigiShots Leopold van Asten - VDL Groep Zidane N.O.P.Indoor Brabant 2017© DigiShots

As the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping first event of the year starts tomorrow, the Dutch Masters have finalised their list of riders.

 

Sadly, American rider Kent Farrington was forced to officially withdraw from The Dutch Masters due to injury. Farrington won the Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva last year and with this victory he started his challenge for the Rolex Grand Slam. Unfortunately, his chance to win the Rolex Grand Slam title is now gone for now.

 

Local riders, Harrie Smolders and Maikel van der Vleuten, currently ranked second and seventh in the world respectively, will be looking to give the home crowd something to cheer about, following in the footsteps of compatriot Leopald van Asten, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix in 2017.

 

A strong contingent of Rolex Testimonees will be attempting to emulate the achievement of fellow Testimonee Scott Brash, who remains the only rider so far to have won the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, following his emphatic victories in 2015.  Kevin Staut (FRA), a winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at The Dutch Masters in 2014, heads the challenge, with Canada’s Eric Lamaze, currently ranked world No. 9, making the trip from his winter base in Florida, USA for the competition. World No. 10 Steve Guerdat (SUI) will be making his 16th appearance in a Major, the only rider to have competed in all Majors since they began in 2013, with Britain’s Scott Brash also competing as he seeks to repeat his remarkable Rolex Grand Slam feat.

 

Reigning European Champion and Olympic silver medalist Peder Fredricson (SWE), world No. 6 Lorenzo de Luca (ITA) and the in-form Henrik Von Eckermann, fresh from victory in FEI World CupTM Qualifier winner in Gothenburg last weekend, will add to the stellar line-up of riders taking part.

Kent Farrington, winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva 2017. Kent Farrington and Gazelle, winners of the Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva 2017.

 

Congratulations on your victory in the Rolex Grand Prix of the CHI Geneva 2017! You came close a few times before, now you have finally succeeded in winning a Major.

Kent Farrington: I am overjoyed, but to be honest I am still in a state of shock. I have been trying to win this Grand Prix for so long. Now that I have finally done it, I find it hard to believe that it really is all over and that I left the show as the winner. It has brought the year to a fantastic close for me!


How difficult is it to assert oneself in the Rolex Grand Prix?

Farrington: I have jumped this class here many times and it is always very difficult. You compete against the top riders and the best horses in the world. The course is always very demanding and the time is tight. When I watched the first pair in the ring, I realised straightaway that it was going to be particularly hard this year. It really was a tough competition and that makes the victory even more valuable for me.


The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping has now begun for you. The next leg is taking place in `s-Hertogenbosch in the Netherlands in March. Have you already been there?

Farrington: I took part in the World Cup final in `s-Hertogenbosch several years ago, but I have never ridden at The Dutch Masters. So, I am especially looking forward to it! It is one of the biggest indoor shows in the world and as is customary for a Grand Slam Major, the best horses and riders in the world will be competing there. So, I will make sure that I am well-prepared.


What is your plan up until then?

Farrington: First of all, I am flying to Florida where I will spend Christmas at home. We will certainly celebrate my Major victory there too. I have a wonderful team behind me, this victory wouldn’t have been possible without them. I will probably stay in Florida for the whole of the winter and then come back to Europe for The Dutch Masters. It will be a very tough job to win the Grand Prix there too, but I love challenges. I will definitely try my very hardest to master the next step in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

Kent Farrington riding Gazelle winning the Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva 2017. Kent Farrington riding Gazelle winning the Rolex Grand Prix at CHI Geneva 2017.

 

Kent Farrington won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHI Geneva 2017. In the last leg of the year of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, the US American jumped to victory on Sunday afternoon at the sold-out Palexpo and thus celebrated the first Major victory in his career.

“This is the one I’ve been aiming to win for years. I came close a couple of times and I am so happy at having won here in Geneva today. My horse jumped incredibly, the crowd was amazing, really supportive. A great way to finish the year for me,” commented Kent Farrington, who had saddled the eleven-year-old mare, Gazelle, for the Rolex Grand Prix.

The 36-year-old can now take on the ultimate challenge in equestrian sport, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping: The rider, who wins three Majors in succession, goes down in history as a Grand Slam Champion and picks up a bonus of one million Euros. “That’s a tall order and I am going to try best,” promised Kent Farrington with a view to the coming Grand Slam legs. The journey continues for him in March at The Dutch Masters in the Netherlands, when he will strive to claim his second Major victory in a row. If he triumphs there as well, he would be riding to take the Grand Slam title in July at the CHIO Aachen 2018 in Germany.

Philipp Weishaupt competed in Geneva as the current Grand Slam contender. Riding Asathir, the German show-jumper unfortunately did not reach the jump-off of the Rolex Grand Prix.

The Dutch Masters, the next Major of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, is being staged in ‘s-Hertogenbosch in the Netherlands from March 8th-11th, 2018.

The current Grand Slam contender, Philipp Weishaupt, riding Asathir during CHI Geneva 2017. The current Grand Slam contender, Philipp Weishaupt, riding Asathir during CHI Geneva 2017.

 

The last qualifier for the Rolex Grand Prix came to an end on Saturday evening and now we know which 40 riders will battle it out to claim the Major victory at the CHI Geneva on Sunday afternoon.

Starting with the two current contenders for the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, Philipp Weishaupt from Germany and Grégory Wathelet from Belgium, the starting list includes the current number one in the world, Kent Farrington from the USA; the reigning individual European Champion, Peder Fredricson from Sweden; the Canadian Olympic gold medallist, Eric Lamaze; the reigning double World Champion, Jeroen Dubbeldam from the Netherlands as well as Ireland’s top rider, Bertram Allen.

The Swiss Olympic gold medallist, Steve Guerdat, who has already jumped to victory in Geneva three times, is also on board together with last year’s winner, Pedro Veniss from Brazil, and the French Olympic team gold medallist, Kevin Staut.

Luciana Diniz will be representing Portugal in the ring and after coming second twice this year, both in Aachen and in Calgary, she will be fighting to take the first Major victory in her career.

The Rolex Grand Prix begins on Sunday at 2:30 p.m. (CET). The complete competition will be broadcast live and for free on the website of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping at www.rolexgrandslam.com.

Gregory Wathelet and Phillipp Weishaupt during the interview at CHI Geneva 2017 Gregory Wathelet and Phillipp Weishaupt during the interview at CHI Geneva 2017

At the CHI Geneva 2017 Philipp Weishaupt and Grégory Wathelet have the chance of claiming their second Major victory this year. An interview with the two Grand Slam candidates about fighting spirit, headstrong partners and prestigious Grands Prix that every rider wants to win once in a lifetime.

 

The competitions at the CHI Geneva began yesterday. What was the atmosphere like here at the Palexpo?

Grégory Wathelet: Simply super! The atmosphere here is fantastic, the crowd is incredible. It is simply a really good show.
Philipp Weishaupt: Absolutely fantastic. We are really enjoying coming here every year, because we simply know what awaits us.


Yesterday the first qualifier for the Rolex Grand Prix already took place. How did it go for you?

Wathelet: It went really well for me. I wanted to qualify for the Grand Prix as soon as possible and coming fourth yesterday meant that I succeeded in doing so. As such, a bit of the pressure is off and now I can concentrate on the Grand Prix on Sunday.
Weishaupt: I rode a young horse in the qualifier yesterday, the eight-year-old mare, Call me Eva, and I was a bit unlucky. The first half of the course went well then I risked too much in the turn to the upright and had a refusal. That was my mistake. But I am optimistic that I will be able to qualify for the Rolex Grand Prix this evening, when I ride my top horse, Asathir.


Does one have a different attitude when competing at such a show as the current Grand Slam contender? Is there more pressure?

Wathelet: Of course. Philipp can win more money here in Geneva than me, so he is under more pressure. (both laugh) No, seriously: Of course, we think about the Grand Slam, but at the end of the day it is the important Grand Prix that we want to win, whether we get a bonus for it or not.
Weishaupt: That’s exactly how I see it too. The prize money always plays a role, but primarily as a top rider you want to win the Grand Prix of Geneva once in your life. The bonus would be super, but all 40 riders will give it their best shot to win. I will do the same, but without thinking about the bonus. If I succeed, then so be it. And if not, life carries on and I will try again next year. 


Which horses do you plan to ride in the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday? 

Wathelet: I will ride Corée, whom I won in Aachen with in July. I have been taking things a bit easier with her over the past weeks so that she is top fit here in Geneva. I will ride her in the Credit Suisse Grand Prix this evening, then she will have a day’s rest and on Sunday we will take on the challenge in the Grand Prix.
Weishaupt: If I qualify for Sunday, I will ride Asathir. She has performed very well over the last few weeks and she loves such big indoor halls like the one here in Geneva. Yesterday I jumped her in a small class and she felt great. I will also be competing with her this evening in the Credit Suisse Grand Prix, and we will hopefully secure our ticket for the Rolex Grand Prix.


If you compare your two top horses with each other, are they similar?

Wathelet: To be honest, I don’t know Philipp’s horse that well, so I can only speak for my mare. She is simply incredible, but incredibly complicated too. So, a real woman! (laughs) But I know she can jump all courses and win everything, if she only lets me ride well enough.
Weishaupt: I don’t think the two of them have much in common, rather the opposite. Perhaps one could say that both have a very strong character. They like to go their own way. But I am in the fortunate position that my mare is very easy to ride. Grégory has to work a bit harder there. 


How about the two of you? Are you similar types of riders?

Weishaupt: It would be great to ride as well as Grégory one day. He can simply steer a horse two seconds faster round a course than anyone else and this is a gift that only very few riders have in the world. It is amazing when you look at the number of different horses he has ridden to victory with.  I hope I will be able to keep pace with him one day.
Wathelet: I think we are actually quite similar. Every rider at this level has to dispose of certain attributes: He has to be well-organised. He has to take what he does really seriously. But, above all, he has to be ambitious, very ambitious! A real fighter. If you don’t seriously want to win at this level, then you will never have a chance of winning. I think Philipp and I have this fighting spirit and that is why we have already been able to win important Grand Prix’s now and again.


How difficult is it going to be for you on Sunday to win the Rolex Grand Prix and thus a further Grand Slam Major? about the two of you? Are you similar types of riders? 

Weishaupt: I don’t think anyone will succeed in doing what Scott Brash did two years ago with his Grand Slam victory, any time soon. There are perhaps five active riders who succeeded in winning three Majors in their career and in some cases 20 years lay between the victories. Winning more than one Major within one season is a huge challenge. But I have a really good horse and will do my very best.
Wathelet: When the Rolex Grand Slam was brought to life and we riders heard about the mode for the first time, we thought it would be impossible to achieve this. Then came Scott and succeeded in pulling this feat off straightaway. So we learned that it is indeed possible. But as Philipp already just said, it is very, very difficult. Every rider dreams of winning these Grands Prix at least once in their careers. We can see that this weekend: All of the big names are here with their top horses. Of course, we all hope and dream of winning the Grand Slam Majors and ideally within one year. But even if several years lie between, it still remains a fantastic achievement. Just like coming fourth or fifth in the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday. That would also be a wonderful result considering the line-up of riders.
Weishaupt: It is definitely going to be a tough competition in any case and whatever the end result is going to be, I am sure we are going to see excellent sport.

The last Major of the year 2017 is in full swing: The best show-jumpers in the world have been competing against each other at the CHI Geneva in Switzerland since Thursday. The first starting places for the Rolex Grand Prix that is endowed with prize money of 1.2 million Swiss Francs have already been allocated.

In the first qualifier, the Credit Suisse Geneva Classic on Thursday evening, the four best riders secured themselves a ticket for the Grand Prix on Sunday. The Dutch show-jumper, Harrie Smolders, rode to victory with Zinius. Abdel Said from Egypt with Hope van Scherpen Donder, the US American Laura Kraut with Deauville S and Grégory Wathelet from Belgium with Eldorado van het Vijverhof secured second to fourth place, respectively.

Grégory Wathelet, the winner of the Rolex Grand Prix at this year’s CHIO Aachen, has the chance of claiming a Grand Slam bonus in Geneva: If he wins the Grand Prix on Sunday, it will be his second non consecutive Major victory within his Grand Slam cycle and he will collect a 250,000-Euro bonus.

Whereas Wathelet proved to be in top form in the opening class of the show, the first qualifier didn’t go well for the current Grand Slam contender, Philipp Weishaupt. After his triumph in Calgary in September, the German rider, who has the prospect of winning his second Major in succession here at the CHI Geneva, wasn’t yet able to secure himself a place on the starting list for the Rolex Grand Prix on the first day.

The riders still have three further occasions to qualify for the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday at 2.30 p.m : The Credit Suisse Grand Prix on Friday at 7.15 p.m, the Coupe de Genève on Saturday at 12.15 p.m and the Rolex IJRC Top 10 Final at 8:30 p.m. It´s only after this last class that we will know the names of the 40 qualified pairs competing for the Major of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

0712_Grégory Wathelet and Eldorado van het Vijverhof competing in the Credit Suisse Geneva Classic at CHI Geneva 2017 Grégory Wathelet and Eldorado van het Vijverhof competing in the Credit Suisse Geneva Classic at CHI Geneva 2017

“Claiming the victory in Geneva will be a huge task”

 

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is returning to Switzerland for the last Major in the year: The best show-jumpers in the world will be competing against each other from December 7th-10th at the CHI Geneva 2017. An interview with the current Grand Slam contender, Philipp Weishaupt, who will be striving to claim his second Major victory in succession.

You won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen in 2016. And recently in September you jumped to victory in the Grand Prix at the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’. 32 years old and you have already notched up two Major victories – that is an impressive achievement …

Philipp Weishaupt: Definitely. Everyone, who starts show jumping, dreams about two things: About Championships and about the legendary Grands Prix like Aachen and Calgary. I am extremely proud to have already won these two competitions at my age. 


What does the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping represent in the jumping sport? 

Weishaupt: The four Majors that the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping encompasses, are indeed the four best shows on the show jumping circuit. Assessed individually, each of the shows enjoy a special reputation, has its own charm and specific challenges. Anyone, who wants to win the Grand Slam, has to prove himself under completely different conditions. That is what makes the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping so unique in the jumping sport and what makes it so very special for us riders. 


You will be competing in Geneva as the current Grand Slam contender. What is different about the two indoor Majors compared to Aachen and Calgary? 

Weishaupt: Aachen and Spruce Meadows probably have the largest grass arenas in the world. Due to this fact alone completely different conditions prevail there compared to at the indoor shows on sand in Geneva and ’s-Hertogenbosch. In ’s-Hertogenbosch, for example, the arena is much, much smaller, so the agility of the horse and rider are much more decisive here. Geneva on the other hand has relatively little to do with the typical character of an indoor show in terms of the riding feeling. Due to the huge arena it is more like a roofed outdoor show, just like in Aachen or Calgary there is plenty of space to canter forwards. That suits me and my horses very well. 


How difficult will it be for you to assert yourself against your fellow riders in Geneva and win the second Major in succession? 

Weishaupt: That is a huge task, but precisely because it is so difficult, is what makes taking on this challenge such particular fun. Qualifying for the Grand Prix is the first big obstacle you have to overcome, because you have to ride against the strongest pairs in the world and ultimately only the best 40 from the qualifiers of the previous days can make it onto the starting list for the Rolex Grand Prix on Sunday. Once you have mastered this obstacle, you have to make sure that your horse has enough energy left for the actual highlight of the show and that it is top fit when you enter the ring for the Grand Prix. Only if this is the case, is it possible to ride flat out and with a little bit of luck leave the ring as the Major winner. 

Philipp Weishaupt, the current contender for the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. Philipp Weishaupt, the current contender for the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

1120_Palexpo The Palexpo in Geneva, the largest indoor arena in the world.

            

CHI Geneva 2017: December 7th-10th, Palexpo, Geneva (SUI)

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is entering the next round: The best riders in the world are travelling to the banks of Lake Geneva for the last Major in the year to face the ultimate challenge of the equestrian sport once again.

Since the first international show in the year 1926, the CHI Geneva has been considered a synonym for jumping sport at the highest level and tradition that comes to life. The names of the winners of the famous Rolex Grand Prix will certainly remain unforgotten.

Last year a Brazilian showjumper wrote history in Geneva: Riding his top horse Quabri de l’Isle, Pedro Veniss asserted himself against the international superstars and celebrated his first ever Major victory at Palexpo, the biggest indoor arena in the world. “It is the best thing ever, the biggest achievement in my career,” is how the 34-year-old Veniss described his outstanding performance almost exactly one year ago, which “made a childhood dream come true” and ensured that his name hit the headlines.

However, recently the name of a young German rider made the headlines in connection with the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping: In September, Philipp Weishaupt won the Grand Prix at the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017 and will thus be competing in Geneva as the current Grand Slam contender. A scenario that the 32-year-old is already familiar with, since he also won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen in 2016. Back then, he didn’t succeed in picking up a Grand Slam bonus, because he didn’t finish first at either of the subsequent Majors. However this is all going to change now: “The fact that I have been able to win the two outdoor Majors has awaken my ambition all the more to win the two indoor Majors. It is going to be difficult, but I am going to try my very hardest,” assured Philipp Weishaupt. If he succeeds in jumping to the top again in Geneva, he would be riding for the Grand Slam title in the Netherlands at The Dutch Masters in March 2018.

So, it goes without saying that all eyes will be cast upon Philipp Weishaupt, when he enters the ring for the Rolex Grand Prix on December 10th. But he won’t be the only rider the spectators will be keeping a close eye on: Grégory Wathelet from Belgium was able to win the Rolex Grand Prix of Aachen in July and thus has the opportunity in Geneva to claim a 250,000 Euro bonus for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle. Not to mention the public’s favourite, Steve Guerdat: The Swiss Olympic gold medallist has already managed to ride to victory in the Geneva Major three times, most recently in the year 2015. He will no doubt be extremely keen to have his name eternalised on the winner’s list of the Rolex Grand Prix again. Who is going to go down in history as Major winner at the CHI Geneva in 2017?

“It isn’t possible to describe the feeling in words”

Philipp Weishaupt, winner of the CP ‚International‘, presented by Rolex at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017. Philipp Weishaupt, winner of the CP ‚International‘, presented by Rolex at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017.

On Sunday, Philipp Weishaupt won the CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex, the Grand Prix of  the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017 and was able to celebrate the second Major victory in his career after his triumph in the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen 2016. An interview with the 32-year-old German rider about his latest sensational result in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

 

Congratulations on your victory in the CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex, the Grand Prix of the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017! Other riders dream about winning a Major their whole lives long, you are now celebrating your second win. Are you as elated as the first time round?

Philipp Weishaupt: Definitely! Aachen and Calgary, these are two Grands Prix that every rider wants to win once in their life. I simply can’t describe in words the feeling of having won both in my comparably young career! My sincere thanks go to my horse LB Convall, who contributed so much towards these victories. Without him they wouldn’t have been possible. He has simply incredible quality! When we won in Aachen, LB Convall was just nine years old and at the start of his career. The victory came as a surprise for many people and made him famous on the international circuit overnight. In Calgary, we were among the favourites from the very beginning and it wasn’t exactly easy for me to fulfil this role. But LB Convall actually did make it easy for me. He gave me a fantastic feeling throughout the whole week of the show and he jumped superbly on Sunday.


After all he knows Spruce Meadows very well…

Weishaupt: Indeed. At the young age of ten LB Convall has already been to Calgary five times. LB Convall simply loves the “International Ring”. He feels particularly at home on such a huge grass arena. We spent five weeks competing at the summer show series here in Spruce Meadows this year and last. That was always great preparation for the CHIO Aachen and of course also for the ‘Masters’. 


In the next two legs of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping you will however have to assert yourself in an indoor arena and on sand. How do you rate your chances at winning a further Major?

Weishaupt: I believe in LB Convall’s quality, also indoors, and will of course prepare him as well as I can for the indoor shows. But we can train as hard as possible and be in fantastic form, but at the end of the day we still need that extra bit of luck on top to win a Major. What Scott Brash pulled off two years ago, namely three Major victories in a row, was sensational and probably no one will be able to repeat this feat in a hurry. But the Grand Slam legs are the four best shows in the world. Uniting the two best indoor shows and the two best outdoor shows is something very special and every rider dreams of winning the Grand Slam. I will certainly concentrate all my energy on this goal!

Philipp Weishaupt and Philipp Weishaupt and "LB Convall" winning the "CP ‘International’ Grand Prix presented by Rolex" at the Spruce Meadows 'Masters' 2017, Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Pascal Renauldon

Philipp Weishaupt has won the CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex, the Grand Prix of the CSIO Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017. The German rider asserted himself in the saddle of LB Convall on Sunday afternoon after two rounds against the top stars of the international show jumping sport and thus triumphed in the second leg of the year of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. After having won the Rolex Grand Prix at the CHIO Aachen in 2016, this was the second Major victory in the career of the 32-year-old show-jumper.

“It is impossible to describe the feeling of winning here in words! My sincere thanks go to my horse LB Convall, without him I certainly wouldn’t be standing here as the winner. He has simply incredible quality,” stated Philipp Weishaupt, who was the only rider to finish double clear after both rounds, relegating Luciana Diniz (POR) with Fit For Fun 13 and the American McLain Ward with HH Azur into second and third place, respectively. Philipp Weishaupt will now once again take on the ultimate challenge in the show jumping sport, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping: The rider, who succeeds in winning three equestrian Majors directly in succession, goes down in history as the Rolex Grand Slam Champion and receives a bonus of one million Euros. So, should Philipp Weishaupt manage a further Major victory in December at the CHI Geneva 2017, he will be riding to take the Grand Slam title in March 2018 at The Dutch Masters in ´s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands. “What Scott Brash pulled off two years ago, namely three Major victories in a row, was sensational and probably no one will be able to repeat this feat in a hurry. But I will certainly concentrate all my energy on trying to do so,” promised Philipp Weishaupt with a view to the next legs of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

Grégory Wathelet also gave it his very best shot in Calgary, nevertheless the winner of the Rolex Grand Prix of the CHIO Aachen 2017 simply wasn’t able to claim his second consecutive Major victory at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’: The Belgian rider excelled with convincing performances in the ring throughout the week of the show. However, on Sunday Wathelet and his stallion Eldorado van het Vijverhof finished 29th in the rankings of the CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex after picking up eight faults in the first round.

The outcome of the Grand Prix wasn’t optimal for Pedro Veniss either, who after claiming the gold ribbon in the Rolex Grand Prix of the CHI Geneva 2016, could have picked up a 250,000 Euro bonus in Calgary for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle: the 34-year-old had one fence down in the first round with his top horse, Quabri de l’Isle, and also collected one penalty point for exceeding the time, which ultimately meant 22nd place for the Brazilian show jumper.

The qualifiers are over, the starting list has been printed: 50 world-class pairs will take on the ultimate challenge on Sunday in the legendary “International Ring” of Spruce Meadows and will battle it out to claim the victory in the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex that is endowed with prize-money to the value of three million Canadian dollars.
Two rounds in the ring at five-star level have to be mastered in this leg of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. If at the end of the two rounds several pairs are still clear, a jump-off will decide, who carries off the Major victory.

The field of participants promises a competition of superlatives. First and foremost, the current Grand Slam contenders Grégory Wathelet from Belgium and Pedro Veniss from Brazil, the present number one in world ranking list Kent Farrington from the USA, the Grand Slam Champion of 2015 and last year’s Major winner Scott Brash from Great Britain and the Canadian Olympic gold medallist Eric Lamaze have all qualified for the Grand Prix. The spectators can additionally look forward to the team Olympic gold medallist Kevin Staut from France, the Major winner of Aachen 2014 Christian Ahlmann from Germany, the recent team European Champion Cian O’Connor from Ireland, the Italian Lorenzo de Luca (current number two in world ranking list), the Swiss Olympic gold medallist Steve Guerdat, the reigning team World Champion Maikel van der Vleuten from the Netherlands and the top female show-jumper Luciana Diniz who rides for Portugal – to mention just a few of the biggest names of the jumping sport that are also found on the starting list of the Grand Prix.

The first round of the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex” starts at 12 noon local time (UTC/GMT -6:00) on Sunday. The entire competition will be broadcast live on the Internet: All of the spectators from Canada can watch who is going leave the arena as the Major winner of Calgary on CBC (www.cbc.ca/sports), starting at 12 noon local time (UTC/GMT -6:00.) or on the website of Spruce Meadows (www.sprucemeadows.com). For viewers from all other countries in the world, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is also making a livestream available on its website at www.rolexgrandslam.com also from 12 noon local time onwards (UTC/GMT -6:00).

World No.1 Kent Farrington and World No.1 Kent Farrington and "Voyeur" at the Spruce Meadows 'Masters' 2017, Photo: Rolex Grand Slam / Ashley Neuhof

Grégory Wathelet and „Eldorado van het Vijverhof” Grégory Wathelet and „Eldorado van het Vijverhof” competing in the “Cana Cup” at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017

Over the coming days the best riders in the world will be competing at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017, the second leg of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, in Calgary, Canada and on Thursday the current Grand Slam contenders Grégory Wathelet and Pedro Veniss were already able to secure themselves a starting place in the Grand Prix on Sunday.

Grégory Wathelet, winner of the last Grand Slam leg in Aachen in July, finished third in the “Cana Cup” on Thursday afternoon and thus claimed one of the 50 tickets available for the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”, which is endowed with prize-money totalling three million Canadian dollars. “My horse ‘Eldorado’ is in fantastic form and now that we have succeeded in qualifying for the Grand Prix, my top priority over the next few days is to keep him fresh and motivated to ensure that we enter the ring on Sunday under optimal conditions,” was how the Belgian rider described his plans up until Sunday, when he will strive to claim his second Major victory in succession. If Grégory Wathelet manages to triumph in the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”, it would mean he will be competing for the Grand Slam title at the CHI Geneva in December.

Pedro Veniss, the winner of the “Rolex Grand Prix” at the CHI Geneva 2016, has the chance to win a 250,000 Euro bonus in the Grand Prix of the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017 on Sunday for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle. The Brazilian show-jumper was also able to prove that he is one of the favourites to win the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”: He namely came fourth in the “Cana Cup”, which means he has also secured himself a starting place in the Grand Prix on Sunday. “I am very satisfied with today’s result,” said Pedro Veniss after the “Cana Cup”. “My horses are in good shape and I hope I will be able to put in a good performance in the Grand Prix on Sunday.”

Four qualifications for the Grand Prix have already taken place, there are still three to come: On Friday the riders have the opportunity to jump their way onto the starting list for the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex” in two different classes – in the “Friends of the Meadows Cup” and in the “Atco Six Bar”. The last tickets will be awarded in the “BMO Nations’ Cup” on Saturday. Then, we will know all 50 pairs, who will be battling it out on Sunday to seize the Major victory in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

The picture enclosed shows the Rolex Grand Slam Trophy in the The Rolex Grand Slam Trophy in the "International Ring" of Spruce Meadows.

Tomorrow, on Wednesday, the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in Calgary, Canada, the second leg in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, kicks off and the first starting places for the Grand Prix on Sunday will already be awarded on the first day of the show.

The riders have the opportunity to qualify for the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”, which is endowed with prize-money totalling three million Canadian dollars, in two competitions every day from Wednesday to Friday. The last tickets will be earned during the Nations’ Cup on Saturday. Hereafter all of the 50 pairs that are allowed to battle it out for the Major victory on Sunday will be known.

The top riders from 19 nations in total have announced their participation. The two equestrian sport legends Eric Lamaze and Ian Millar are heading the field for the host country, Canada. Among others, the current number one in the world ranking list, Kent Farrington, as well as Beezie Madden, this year’s World Cup Final winner McLain Ward and Lauren Hough have travelled in from the neighbouring country, the USA. The entire European elite has also made the long journey to Canada: Last year’s winner Scott Brash (GBR), Kevin Staut (FRA), Christian Ahlmann (GER), Lorenzo de Luca (ITA), Steve Guerdat (SUI), Sergio Alvarez Moya (ESP), Henrik von Eckermann (SWE), Cian O`Connor (IRE), Maikel van der Vleuten (NED) and Luciana Diniz (POR) are just a few of the famous names that will be representing the European flags in Calgary.

Of course, the two current contenders of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping will also be on board in the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’: The Belgian rider Grégory Wathelet could succeed in taking the next step towards winning the Grand Slam here in Calgary. If, after his victory in the “Rolex Grand Prix” of the CHIO Aachen in July, he is now also able to win the “CP ‘International‘, presented by Rolex”, this would be his second Major victory in succession, which would mean he would be riding to claim the Grand Slam title at the CHI Geneva in December. At the latter Major, Pedro Veniss was on the top step of the winner’s podium last year. A triumph in Calgary would thus earn the Brazilian rider a bonus of 250,000 Euros for two Major victories within one Grand-Slam cycle.

However, first of all each of the athletes has to master the qualifying phase: Everything kicks off on Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. local time with the “Telus Cup”, where the three best placed riders can win a direct ticket for the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex” on Sunday.

“Everyone has respect for a Major victory!”

The picture enclosed shows Gregory Wathelet and The picture enclosed shows Gregory Wathelet and "Corée", winners of the "Rolex Grand Prix" at CHIO Aachen 2017.

It is time once again! The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is welcoming the best riders in the world to the second Major of the year in Calgary, Canada: At the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ from September 6th-10th the Belgian show-jumper, Grégory Wathelet, will particularly be the focus of attention, because as the current contender of the Grand Slam title, he will be striving to claim his second Major victory in succession. The 36-year-old reveals in the following interview what goals he has set himself for the coming leg of the Rolex Grand Slam, what challenges the horse and rider are faced with in Spruce Meadows and why September 10th is to be his big day on two counts. 

 

Your triumph in the “Rolex Grand Prix” at the CHIO Aachen 2017 was your first Major victory. A special milestone in your career?

Grégory Wathelet: Definitely. It is the dream of every rider to be eternalised on the winners board in Aachen and for me it is something really special to have my name on that list. A Major victory is different to other Grand Prix victories. Something that everyone has respect for, everyone congratulates you. To see my team and my horse owners so happy in Aachen, was the best feeling in the world for me. 


With this victory your Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping has now begun.

Wathelet: I am delighted to take on this challenge! It was a great thing for us riders when the Grand Slam was brought into being, after all it unites the best shows in the world. Everyone tries to perform even better in the Majors, ride even a little stronger. I now have the opportunity to really prove myself in the Grand Slam and I am very much looking forward to the coming legs!


What is special about the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’?

Wathelet: It is a very exceptional show in a place that we riders actually aren’t used to any more: The atmosphere is unique, full of history and tradition, as is the case in Aachen for example. Spruce Meadows is nevertheless different to all the other Grand Slam Majors: The obstacles are built differently, the course design is extraordinary. Everything appears bigger and mightier, for the horses too. You need a horse that isn’t overwhelmed by these dimensions. That’s why I rely on “Eldorado”. He already demonstrated his quality in Calgary last year and in the meantime we have added several very good results to the list at other shows. He is a horse that can jump over everything, anywhere. 


It is Grand Prix day in Calgary on September 10th – and your birthday! What do you want for your birthday?

Wathelet: The victory, of course! (laughing) No, seriously it is pure coincidence that these two events fall on the same day, but I try not to think about it too much. I simply want to be as good in the ring as I can and then see what happens. The class will be difficult, the competition will be tough. To be honest,  my chance of winning the Grand Prix is exactly as high or low as it is for any of the other riders. Everyone wants to win, everyone will compete with their best horse. But I will certainly exploit my chance to the full. I don’t want to regret anything later! I will arrive in Calgary with top-trained horses and will fight hard to make sure that September 10th is going to be a really big day for me!

The picture enclosed shows the International Ring of Spruce Meadows. It can be used free of charge (picture: Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping/Kit Houghton) International Ring of Spruce Meadows

When sport writes history, then an athlete has become a hero, a victory turns into a triumph, a venue into a symbol. In this respect Spruce Meadows is legendary.

The best riders in the world have been meeting up at the impressive equestrian centre at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Canada since 1976 to compete against each other at the highest level. The Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in September, a leg of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, is the pinnacle of the show season. The rider, who leaves the “International Ring” as the Major winner after the Grand Prix, has secured himself a place in the hall of fame of the equestrian sport.

In 2016, it was Scott Brash, who was able to carry off the victory in the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”. Just like the year before, when the British rider succeeded in claiming the legendary triumph in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2015: As the first rider ever, Brash won three Majors in direct succession and thus secured himself the Grand Slam title.

Grégory Wathelet would be only too delighted to follow his lead: After riding to victory in the “Rolex Grand Prix” at the CHIO Aachen 2017, the Belgian rider will head for Calgary as the current Grand Slam contender. If he is allowed to not only celebrate his 37th birthday on September 10th, 2017, but also his second consecutive Major victory, it will mean Wathelet would be competing in Geneva in December to take the Grand Slam title.

“Every rider dreams of winning the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. The Majors are the best and most difficult shows in our sport. You have to compete against the strongest pairs in the world and I know that it will be very difficult to also win in Calgary. But for me this is now perhaps a unique opportunity and I will put all my energy into it,” promised Wathelet, who was able to notch up his best placing in Calgary so far two years ago, when he came sixth in the Grand Prix.

Pedro Veniss also has nice recollections of the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2015, because he finished third in the “CP ‘International’, presented by Rolex”. In 2016, the Brazilian rider also put in a highly successful performance at the show and ultimately ranked eighth in the Grand Prix. This year, he was already able to record a Grand Prix victory at five-star level at Spruce Meadows during the summer series.

There couldn’t be a better time for Veniss to jump to the top in Calgary again. Since he won the “Rolex Grand Prix” at CHI Geneva last year, he now has the chance of picking up a bonus for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle. “My horses are well prepared and they already jumped fantastically here in the summer. I believe in our chances,” the 34-year-old stated. “But ultimately the decision will be taken in the ring.”

Scott Brash, Grégory Wathelet, Pedro Veniss – these are just three of the big names, who want to prove themselves at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017. But who will indeed succeed in claiming the Major victory on September 10th? In the end, the sport will write its own history and a new chapter in the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping.

Interview with Major winner Gregory Wathelet

On Sunday, Gregory Wathelet claimed the victory in the “Rolex Grand Prix” at the CHIO Aachen 2017. In an interview, the Belgian rider talked about the fascination of Aachen, the material that Major winners are made of and his birthday plans.

 

Congratulations on winning the Major in Aachen! Tell us about your “Rolex Grand Prix” experience!

Gregory Wathelet: It was simply fantastic! The atmosphere in Aachen is always unique, just like the crowd. It is a really special feeling every time when one rides into the Stadium, not at all comparable with the other shows one competes at every weekend. Everyone knows in advance that the “Rolex Grand Prix” is going to present difficult challenges and it was no different this time either. The horses have to convince with their scope, technique and speed. I am incredibly proud of my mare. I don’t think one could put it down to luck. I believe “Coree” simply jumped exceptionally. Today’s victory was down to her. Thanks to her my name is now entered on the winners’ board in Aachen and that is the most magnificent gift ever for me!


When did you realise that Sunday could perhaps become your day?

Wathelet: To be honest not until the final rider, Laura Kraut, had taken the last obstacle in the jump-off. Everything was open until the very end, all competitors were highly-motivated. The Grand Slam Majors are the best and most difficult shows in the world. It doesn’t suffice to give just 100 percent. One has to give 500 percent and simply hope that it is enough. This time we pulled it off. 


This victory means your personal Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping has now begun. So, where does it go from here for you?

Wathelet: The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is a great challenge for us riders. We are extremely grateful to Rolex for their huge commitment to our sport and for enabling such fantastic shows like Aachen, Calgary, Geneva and `s-Hertogenbosch. I believe every rider dreams of winning the Grand Slam and it goes without saying that I will give it my best shot and prepare myself as well as possible for the next Major. But first of all I want to savour this victory here in Aachen. Over the next few days, I will then draw up a plan for Calgary together with my team. 


It is your birthday on September 10th. It is coincidentally the very day on which the Grand Prix is taking place in Calgary. But, wouldn’t a second Major victory in succession be a wonderful birthday present?

Wathelet: Yes, of course (laughs). But, as I said, at the moment I am still overjoyed about my victory in Aachen. We will have to wait and see what happens thereafter. But one thing is sure, I will certainly be celebrating my birthday in Calgary this year.

Gregory Whatelet with the Rolex Grand Slam signpost Gregory Whatelet with the Rolex Grand Slam signpost (picture: Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping/Kit Houghton)

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping has begun for Gregory Wathelet

40,000 spectators were there live when sporting history was written at the CHIO Aachen 2017: After two rounds and the subsequent jump-off in the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen”, Gregory Wathelet was able to assert himself against the entire world elite with “Coree” and win the first leg in the year of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping. Incidentally, this was the first Major victory in the Belgian rider’s career.

“It is simply a dream come true to see my name on the winners’ board in Aachen! It doesn’t suffice to give 100 percent to win a Major. One has to give 500 percent and that is what we did today. My horse was simply incredible,” stated an overjoyed, Gregory Wathelet, who will now take on the ultimate challenge in equestrian sport: The show-jumper, who succeeds in riding to victory in three consecutive Majors, wins the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping and one million Euros in addition to the prize-money. So, Gregory Wathelet’s full focus will now be on Calgary, where at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters” 2017 from September 6th-10th, he will be striving to claim his second Major title.

The winners of the last Majors weren’t able to redeem their chance of claiming a Grand Slam bonus: Scott Brash, who secured himself the top step of the winner’s podium at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2016, had the opportunity of claiming a 250,000 Euro bonus for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle here in Aachen. However, the British rider picked up four faults in the first round with the mare “Ursula XII” and finished the class in ninth place after the second round. Indeed, the winner of the CHI Geneva in 2016, Pedro Veniss, could not participate in the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen”. Over the course of the show week, luck was not on his side, so the Brazilian rider didn’t succeed in qualifying for the Grand Prix. However, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is not over for Pedro Veniss yet: In September at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2017, for him 250,000 Euros will be at stake for the second Major victory within a Grand Slam cycle.

Gregory Wathelet, winner of the Gregory Wathelet, winner of the "Rolex Grand Prix" at CHIO Aachen 2017

The Rolex Grand Slam live

For all those people, who cannot be there in person on Sunday, when the best riders in the world battle it out to claim the victory in the Major, the “Rolex Grand Prix” of the CHIO Aachen 2017, which starts at 1.15 p.m. (CEST), the jumping competition is being broadcast live on TV and on the Rolex Grand Slam website.

The viewers from Germany can watch the first round of the “Rolex Grand Prix” live on TV, starting at 1.15 p.m. on WDR. ARD is then responsible for the live transmission of the second round, which commences punctually at 3.15 p.m.

For viewers from all other countries, the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is transmitting a livestream of the event directly on its website: Starting at 1.15 p.m. (CEST), the entire competition will be broadcast at www.rolexgrandslam.com.

A Grand Slam bonus is at stake for Scott Brash in Aachen on Sunday. A Grand Slam bonus is at stake for Scott Brash in Aachen on Sunday.

A Major final with world stars and surprises

The show week of the CHIO Aachen 2017 is gradually coming to a close and now we can already reveal, which 40 riders are going to compete in the Final on Sunday afternoon, the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen”.

A huge surprise up front: The current Grand Slam contender, Pedro Veniss, will not be on the starting list, as became clear after the third and last qualifier today, the “Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia”: “I noticed in the ring that my horse, ‘Quabri de l‘Isle’ didn’t feel good today. He wasn’t in his usual form, so I retired right after the first few obstacles,” commented a visibly disappointed, Pedro Veniss, who could only have secured himself a place in the Major final, if he had achieved a top placing in today’s class. “It was my big dream to compete in the ‘Rolex Grand Prix’ on Sunday, but of course the well-being of ‘Quabri’ definitely takes priority.”

Even if luck wasn’t on the side of Pedro Veniss in Aachen, his personal Rolex Grand Slam is not over yet. Because at the 2017 Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in September, the Brazilian rider still has the chance to claim his second Major victory within a Grand Slam cycle. A bonus that the British show-jumper, Scott Brash, will have his sights set on this Sunday. Because the winner of the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2016 was one of the 40 riders to qualify for the “Rolex Grand Prix”.

Scott Brash will be battling it out against the strongest competitors the international show jumping sport has to offer – heading his list of rivals is the current number one in the world rankings, Kent Farrington from the USA, who demonstrated that he is in absolute top form after riding to victory in today’s “Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia”. His team colleagues, Beezie Madden, McLain Ward, Lauren Hough and Laura Kraut are all on board too. Also on the starting list for the “Rolex Grand Prix”: the Olympic gold-medallist Steve Guerdat from Switzerland, Eric Lamaze from Canada as well as Kevin Staut and Roger-Yves Bost from France. The Irish rider Bertram Allen; the Italian show-jumper Lorenzo de Luca, Spain’s Sergio Alvarez Moya, Henrik von Eckermann from Sweden and the Dutchman Harrie Smolders have also secured themselves a ticket for the final. Together with the youngest Major winner of all time, Olivier Philippaerts from Belgium, who won the Grand Prix at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2012 at the tender age of 19, he is accompanied by his fellow countrymen Gregory Wathelet and Pieter Devos, who won the Major in Calgary in 2013.

Twelve riders will be representing the host nation, including last year’s winner, Philipp Weishaupt; the three-time Aachen Champion, Ludger Beerbaum; the winner from the year 2005, Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum as well as the youngsters, Laura Klaphake and Maurice Tebbel.

The best riders in the world will be competing against each other in the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen” on Sunday, the competition commences at 1:15 p.m. One of them will leave the most famous arena in the world as the new Major winner. The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is entering a new round!
 

Kent  FARRINGTON riding Uceko USA Kent Farrington and “Uceko”, winners of the “Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia”, the third and last qualifier for the “Rolex Grand Prix” on Sunday

Eric Lamaze wins the first qualifier

The first ‘major’ test at the CHIO Aachen 2017 is over and just like last year the victory in the “Turkish Airlines-Prize of Europe”, the first qualifier for the “Rolex Grand Prix” on Sunday, went to the Canadian rider, Eric Lamaze and “Fine Lady”. In the jump-off, the pair relegated Ludger Beerbaum from Germany, who had saddled “Chiara”, and the Irish show-jumper Bertram Allen with “Molly Malone”, into second and third place, respectively.

The current Grand Slam contender, Pedro Veniss, also succeeded in qualifying for the jump-off with his top horse, “Quabri de l’Isle” at his debut appearance on the “Holy Grass” of Aachen. However, the pair picked up eight penalty points in the jump-off, which meant they ultimately ranked 18th. A placing that nevertheless has increased the Brazilian rider’s chances of making sure his name is on the starting list of the “Rolex Grand Prix”, because the best 40 riders from the three qualifications earn themselves a ticket for the final. However, nothing is anywhere near decided yet, we won’t know exactly which pairs will be competing in the Major until after the third and last qualifier on Friday afternoon.

The next qualifying competition for the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen”, which is endowed with prize-money to the value of one million Euros, is the “Mercedes-Benz Nations’ Cup”, a floodlit class that starts at 7.30 p.m. on Thursday evening. Here, the riders who rank under the top 18, directly secure themselves a ticket for the final. The “Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia, which commences at 12.45 p.m. early on Friday afternoon is the final opportunity for the riders to jump their way into final of the Major.

Incidentally, Scott Brash, who won the Grand Slam title in 2015, chose not to compete in the first qualifier. As the winner of the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ in 2016, the British rider not only has the chance of picking up the bonus for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle, he has also already pre-qualified for the “Rolex Grand Prix” with his mare “Ursula XII”.

Eric  LAMAZE riding Fine Lady 5 CAN Winner of the Turkish Airlines-Prize of Europe Eric LAMAZE riding Fine Lady 5 CAN Winner of the Turkish Airlines-Prize of Europe

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is back in Germany: The CHIO Aachen 2017 is in full swing and over the next few days, the utmost and ultimate priority for the top show-jumpers in the world is to secure one of the coveted places in the grand final on Sunday afternoon, the “Rolex Grand Prix, the Grand Prix of Aachen”, which is endowed with one million Euros in prize-money.

Not only is the host nation represented by first-class riders like Ludger Beerbaum, Christian Ahlmann, Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum, Marcus Ehning and last year’s winner Philipp Weishaupt. The team the USA has sent to the Soers also includes the country’s best riders among others the current number one in the world rankings, Kent Farrington, as well as the winner of the world cup final, McLain Ward. The same can be said of the French participants, namely three riders of the gold-winning team from the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio are on board – Kevin Staut, Roger-Yves Bost and Philippe Rozier. The visitors of the World Equestrian Festival can additionally look forward to the Canadian bronze medal winner from Rio, Eric Lamaze, the top Irish rider Bertram Allen, the Italian high-flyer Lorenzo de Luca and the Swiss Olympic gold-medallist, Steve Guerdat.

For all of these athletes, the victory in the Grand Prix on Sunday would also mean the beginning of their personal Rolex Grand Slam: The rider, who succeeds in winning three equestrian sport Majors in direct succession, goes down in history as the winner of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping and claims a bonus of one million Euros. Scott Brash from Great Britain is the only rider to have achieved this feat so far – in 2014/15 – and all eyes will be cast on him once again at the CHIO Aachen 2017: Since, thanks to his repeated triumph at the Spruce Meadows ‘Masters’ 2016, he has the chance of picking up a 250,000-Euro bonus for two Major victories within one Grand Slam cycle.

Pedro Veniss travels to Aachen as the current Grand Slam contender: After his victory at the CHI Geneva 2016 last December, the Brazilian will now be striving to win his second Major in succession. If he jumps to victory in the “Rolex Grand Prix” on Sunday, he will be riding for the Grand Slam title in Calgary in September.

However, like most of the other riders, Pedro Veniss first of all has to qualify for the Grand Prix: The qualifiers for securing a place on the starting list of the “Rolex Grand Prix” kick off with the “Turkish Airlines-Prize of Europe”, the main competition on Wednesday, followed by the “Mercedes-Benz Nations’ Cup” on Thursday evening and the “Prize of North Rhine-Westphalia”, the main competition on Friday. Only those riders, who convince with an excellent placing in at least one of these classes, will receive one of the 40 tickets available for the Major final.

Will Pedro Veniss be able to assert himself against the strong field of participants at the CHIO Aachen 2017? Or will a new Major winner emerge from the “Rolex Grand Prix”? The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is looking forward to a thrilling opening event of the year! 

The picture enclosed shows the Rolex Grand Slam trophy (picture: Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping/Andreas Steindl) The picture enclosed shows the Rolex Grand Slam trophy (picture: Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping/Andreas Steindl)

The Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping is welcoming the best show-jumpers in the world to the first Major of the year 2017, in Germany: They will be competing against each other at the CHIO Aachen from July 14th to 23rd and on the final Sunday will be battling it out for the victory in the famous “Rolex Grand Prix”. An interview with the current Grand Slam contender, Pedro Veniss from Brazil, about childhood dreams come true, a summer in Calgary and the most loveable horse in the world.

 

Your Major victory in Geneva was six months ago. How have you and “Quabri de l’Isle” been doing since then?

Pedro Veniss: It is always still a fantastic feeling when I think back. I will remember this victory eternally. It was one of the most important in my career so far. After Geneva we gave “Quabri” a time-out from the sport and he was only implemented as a stud stallion. Afterwards, we took part at a few smaller shows and gradually worked our way back up. Versailles in May was our first big five star event after Geneva.


And that is where you won the “Rolex Grand Prix”!

Veniss: Yes, that was super! “Quabri” already showed that he is in good shape there. But to prepare him for Aachen as well as possible, I have spent June in Spruce Meadows with him and took part in the Summer Series. The huge grass arenas in Aachen and Spruce Meadows are very special, you don’t find hardly anything like it anywhere else in the world. Philipp Weishaupt and “LB Convall” were also in Calgary last summer – and they subsequently won in Aachen. So, I am hoping the plan will work just as well for me.


How do you assess your chances of winning?

Veniss: In “Quabri” I have a wonderful partner under the saddle, who is up to every task. A horse that you can win the big classes with! He doesn’t have any bad days, always gives his best, whatever event we are at and he loves competing. His mentality is simply incredible and he is also the most loveable horse in the world too. I am extremely lucky to be able to ride him and I certainly think he is capable of winning in Aachen. But I have to be just as good on that day too!


It is going to be the first time you have ever competed in Aachen. What do you think is awaiting you?

Veniss: Coming from Brazil let me put it like this: Aachen is the Maracanã of equestrian sports! As a child it was always my dream to ride in Aachen one day. I already had the opportunity to do so when I was only 23 years old during the World Equestrian Games in 2006 as a member of the Brazilian team. But unfortunately my horse sustained an injury a week beforehand. So, it is an even more unique feeling that this dream is finally coming true.


What do you think the moment is going to be like when you ride into the Main Stadium in Aachen for the first time?

Veniss: It is going to be an unforgettable experience! I think, all of the stages of my career that actually brought me to Aachen will pass in front of my eyes again. My family will be in the crowd and will cheer me on. It is going to be a really, really special show for me and I am going to give it my very best shot to win the “Rolex Grand Prix” on Sunday!

The picture enclosed shows Pedro Veniss and The picture enclosed shows Pedro Veniss and "Quabri de l'Isle", winners of the Major in Geneva in 2016 and current Rolex Grand Slam contenders.

Social News Room

How do the best riders in the world prepare themselves for the ultimate challenge? How do the winners of a Major celebrate their victory and how do their teams back home welcome them? What happens behind the scenes at the world-famous showgrounds in Calgary, Geneva, Aachen and `s-Hertogenbosch?

With immediate effect, the new social newsroom of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping will keep you constantly updated about all of the Majors, the Major winners and those, who want to become one. All entries on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook with the hashtag #RolexGrandSlam will appear bundled together on the homepage of the Rolex Grand Slam of Show Jumping, so that you don’t have to miss any news on the most prestigious trophy on the international equestrian sport circuit from now on!
 

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